Posts Tagged ‘Tai Chi’

Qigong – Low Back, Knees, & Hips

570_feel_the_qiQigong supports the whole body even when we focus on specific areas. The previous two blogs addressed the upper body and back. Though those were addressed our whole body benefits. Blood flow increases and Qi moves better as we practice regularly promoting overall well-being.  The side benefits embrace so many, senses, balance,  mental clarity, circulation, bodily functions, and overall awareness to name a few.  It’s like we move and function with our complete body rather than one specific area. 

Think about it.  When we walk, our brain sends messages to our legs and feet to engage propelling us forward, backward, up, down, fast, or slow.  walking_person_silhouette_clip_art_15563Without noting anything else within ourselves or our surroundings, our legs and feet simply continue, doing our bidding, until… we hit a patch of ice in the winter, a root on the path, or a branch, then, then the rest of the body gets involved with a flinch like reaction to the unexpected followed by gyrations, that may put a contortionist to shame, just to keep our balance, which often subsequently fails.  We then find ourselves in a face plant, on our butt, or some other pretzel like configuration, because we weren’t engaging our whole being in the process of simply walking.  mfu0014I’m not saying we’ll never stumble, trip, or fall again, but when these interruptions of movement come along we’ll be more prepared, because we learned to involve our whole being in our movements.  Qigong teaches us to move from our core, our Dantian, our energy center.

In this next section the Low Back, Hips, and Legs will be the focus of our training.  As we train, however, think about initiating your movement from the Dantian.  The torso of the body has upper, middle, and lower Dantian areas, but a primary Dantian location resides about two finger widths below the navel. This may also be referenced as the Hara.  So, as we move, think of initiating or engaging the movement first from that point.  This series of movements may help with disc problems, low back muscle degeneration, stress, or strain, hip joint and associated soft tissues in that region, chronic structural or muscular issues, recovery from injuries, and arthritis.  Other disharmonies may be addressed as well, these are just some examples.

As I’ve stated before, Qigong is one of the less demanding forms of exercise and movement, yet any physical activity should be approached to work within your own abilities and limitations. If you cannot get the full range of motion at first, make it a goal and go as far as you can. If you have any health issues, concerns, or limited mobility consult with your doctor first before exerting yourself more than you should.  The practice of Qigong has been known to improve overall health and personal well-being.  Also, though not mentioned before, the instructions for this series recommend a certain number of reps.  These may be increased or decreased according to your own needs.  If you feel stiff or sore in a given area  couple hours following additional reps, then too many have been done and you should reduce the number of reps.  This is especially true in cases of arthritic conditions or recovery.  Listen to your body.

If you have questions, you may direct them to me through either this blog or through my websitehttp://www.eastwesthealingarts.org.  If you live in the Portland, Maine area, you’re invited to join in for not only Qigong classes, but also Taiji at the Maine Center for Taijiquan & Qigong.  The link is added here http://www.mainetaiji.com/, so you may visit the website for the class schedule and details on our studio.

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Lets begin with the knees.  Before the actual movement, keep in mind the importance of maintaining healthy knees.  The knees and shoulders are the two most common areas for injury and strain because they have more range of motion than other joints in the human body.  We should do all we can to care for these areas.  Let’s begin!

Therapeutic Qigong – Part Three

Position 13 – Knee Rotation

Begin with Feet together.

Place both hands slightly on your hands.

  1. Slowly circle knees clockwise, 4 times
  2. Repeat the knee circles, counter clockwise, 4 times

Important – As you circle your knees, you are also exercising your hips, knees, and ankles.  Don’t forget to breathe evenly.

Position 14 – Side Lunge Turn

Body Opposite 45

Take a big step to the left and place both hands on your waist.

  1. Exhale as you slowly bend left leg and turn your body to the right at a 45 degree angle.
  2. Inhale as you slowly turn your body back to the center position, straightening both legs and shifting your weight to your center.
  3. Exhale as you slowly bend right leg and turn your body to the left at a 45 degree angle.
  4. Inhale as you slowly turn your body back to the center position, straightening both legs and shifting your weight to your center.

Repeat steps 1-4

Important – Bend legs as low as you can.  Keep you back straight

Position 15 – Cover Knee and Stretch Leg

Begin with feet together

  1. Place both hands on knees
  2. Slowly bend both knees with good support from feet
  3. Place hands on the tops of the feet, raise hips as you straighten legs
  4. Slowly roll upper body up and let hands relax at your side.
  5. Repeat above one time

Important Note: Normal breath.  Try to keep hands on feet as you raise hips and straighten legs.  This will aid lower back and associated leg muscle tissues.

Position 16 – Cover Opposite Knee,

Alternately Raise Arm

Take a big step to the left

  1. Cover left knee with the right hand, inhale
  2. Raise left arm forward and up over your head, palms up, simultaneously bending both knees, horse riding stance, exhale.
  3. Straighten legs and cover right knee with left hand, hands now on opposite knees, inhale.
  4. Raise right arm forward and up over your head, palms up, simultaneously bending both knees, horse riding stance, exhale.
  5. Straighten legs and cover left knee with right hand, hands now on opposite knees, inhale.
  6. Raise left arm forward and up over your head, palms up, simultaneously bending both knees, horse riding stance, exhale.
  7. Straighten legs and cover right knee with left hand, hands now on opposite knees, inhale.
  8. Raise right arm forward and up over your head, palms up, simultaneously bending both knees, horse riding stance, exhale.

Important – Breathe evenly.  When in horse stance, keep your back straight.

Position 17 – Arm Raise and Knee Hug

Begin with feet together.

  1. Slowly step forward with left foot, putting weight on left foot.  Raise arms above head with arms straight, palms inward, inhale.
  2. Separate arms to side, lift up right knee with both hands as high as you can, exhale.
  3. Step back with right foot and raise arms up again with palms inward, arms straight, weight on left foot.
  4. Circle arms down to your side and step back with left foot.
  5. Slowly step forward with right foot, putting weight on right foot.  Raise arms above head with arms straight, palms inward, inhale.
  6. Separate arms to side, lift up left knee with both hands as high as you can, exhale.
  7. Step back with left foot and raise arms up again with palms inward, arms straight, weight on right foot.
  8. Circle arms down to your side and step back with right foot.

Important Note: Stretch Arms as high as you can.  Breathe deeply, hug your knees as close to your chest as you can.

Position 18 – Slow Walking Forward / Backward

Begin with feet together, place hands on waist and relax shoulders.

  1. Step forward with left foot, lift right heel, weight on left foot.
  2. Shift weight back to right foot (sit back, bend right knee), lift toe up, heel down.
  3.   Step forward with right foot and put weight on right, left heel up
  4. Shift weight to left foot (sit back, bending left knee), right toe up and heel down.
  5. Shift weight to right foot with both legs straight, left heel up.
  6. Again shift weight to left (sit back) and right toe up.
  7. Step back with right foot.
  8. Step back with left foot, bringing feet together.  Repeat above with opposite foot movement.

Important Note: Walk slowly.  When shifting weight, put full weight on one side then the other, keeping back straight.  When stepping back, step with toes first, and the rest of the foot follows (toe, ball of the foot, heel)         

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Wholistic Living – Exercise Within Your Personal Bounds

Snow SkiingThese days of modern conveniences reduce our level of physical activity.  We often find ourselves sitting, idly standing, or doing some sort of repetitious activity that doesn’t require much physical exertion.  Changing to a healthier lifestyle includes a level of exercise that works for you.

These days of modern conveniences reduce our level of physical activity.  We often find ourselves sitting, idly standing, or doing some sort of repetitious activity that doesn’t require much physical exertion.  Changing to a healthier lifestyle includes a level of exercise that works for you.

Everyone won’t do the same level of activity in any exercise program.  Our body type, age, physical limitations, gender, even blood type can influence the type of activity that suits us best.   Not everyone can or wants to train in martial arts.  Some may want to take Yoga, Tai Chi, or Qi Gong instead.  Running works well for some, but jogging may work better for others.

As seasons change, so do the activities, unless you live in an area where seasons don’t affect outside activities.  With winter upon us in the Northeast, the outside use of canoes, kayaks, and hiking gear may be exchanged for snowshoes or cross-country skis.  In the spring and summer accessories are switched again to accommodate the season.  Outdoor activities may be substituted by more indoor workouts through a gym or in home exercise accessories.

Age doesn’t mean we stop our activities.  The lifestyle remains active with activities that harmonize with our age and physical abilities.  Maybe we used to run five miles a day.  Now, we run three.  Also, you’re never too old to start an activity.  People in their 50’s or 60’s begin new higher impact exercise programs, but they approach them gradually and sometimes with a qualified trainer.  Level and intensity of activity should be in harmony with age.  There are always exceptions, but the key is… listen to your body.

TrainerBeginning a new activity may be challenging particularly if you’re in a mixed age and gender group.  If you are uncertain of how to approach a particular program, seek a fellow knowledgeable participant who could act as a mentor or seek a qualified trainer.  A good trainer, that is genuinely interested in the individual, is a real asset to any program.  If there isn’t a formal teacher to help you ease into a program that works for you then go slow.  Some physical stiffness or discomfort can be expected, but too much may be a case of exceeding your physical limitations.  Again, take your time.

Stretching before and after any physical activity is always beneficial.  Stretching warms up the muscle groups, prevent injuries, and curtails some stiffness and aches and pains.  Cardiovascular exertion warms up our heart when the physical activity is demanding like martial arts.  Stretches and cardio workouts should begin slow and work toward a peak with a short cool down to keep yourself limber and in tune for the more intense portion of a workout.  Regular massage is also beneficial to keep your body flexible and in proper tone.  Someone who works out regularly can receive a massage every week if they like, but they can often go four to six weeks between sessions, unless there’s an event or injury.

Above all, consult a medical professional or trainer to determine which activities to perform or avoid for your lifestyle.  Chances are you’ll be able to perform some activity within the bounds of your physical abilities.  Your life and health will improve even if you have to go slow at first because of physical limits and weight.

Physical exercise isn’t about impressing others. Your opponent is you.  Do the best you can each time. Go at your own pace.  The benefits will be reaped in time.  Physical exercise through QiGong, Tai Chi, swimming, the local gym, hiking, snow shoeing, running, martial arts, yoga, aerobics, walking, or what ever else, it’s all about improving your life.

Take time for you and exercise.Group QiGong Pic