Posts Tagged ‘Stress Reduction’

Qigong – Low Back, Knees, & Hips

570_feel_the_qiQigong supports the whole body even when we focus on specific areas. The previous two blogs addressed the upper body and back. Though those were addressed our whole body benefits. Blood flow increases and Qi moves better as we practice regularly promoting overall well-being.  The side benefits embrace so many, senses, balance,  mental clarity, circulation, bodily functions, and overall awareness to name a few.  It’s like we move and function with our complete body rather than one specific area. 

Think about it.  When we walk, our brain sends messages to our legs and feet to engage propelling us forward, backward, up, down, fast, or slow.  walking_person_silhouette_clip_art_15563Without noting anything else within ourselves or our surroundings, our legs and feet simply continue, doing our bidding, until… we hit a patch of ice in the winter, a root on the path, or a branch, then, then the rest of the body gets involved with a flinch like reaction to the unexpected followed by gyrations, that may put a contortionist to shame, just to keep our balance, which often subsequently fails.  We then find ourselves in a face plant, on our butt, or some other pretzel like configuration, because we weren’t engaging our whole being in the process of simply walking.  mfu0014I’m not saying we’ll never stumble, trip, or fall again, but when these interruptions of movement come along we’ll be more prepared, because we learned to involve our whole being in our movements.  Qigong teaches us to move from our core, our Dantian, our energy center.

In this next section the Low Back, Hips, and Legs will be the focus of our training.  As we train, however, think about initiating your movement from the Dantian.  The torso of the body has upper, middle, and lower Dantian areas, but a primary Dantian location resides about two finger widths below the navel. This may also be referenced as the Hara.  So, as we move, think of initiating or engaging the movement first from that point.  This series of movements may help with disc problems, low back muscle degeneration, stress, or strain, hip joint and associated soft tissues in that region, chronic structural or muscular issues, recovery from injuries, and arthritis.  Other disharmonies may be addressed as well, these are just some examples.

As I’ve stated before, Qigong is one of the less demanding forms of exercise and movement, yet any physical activity should be approached to work within your own abilities and limitations. If you cannot get the full range of motion at first, make it a goal and go as far as you can. If you have any health issues, concerns, or limited mobility consult with your doctor first before exerting yourself more than you should.  The practice of Qigong has been known to improve overall health and personal well-being.  Also, though not mentioned before, the instructions for this series recommend a certain number of reps.  These may be increased or decreased according to your own needs.  If you feel stiff or sore in a given area  couple hours following additional reps, then too many have been done and you should reduce the number of reps.  This is especially true in cases of arthritic conditions or recovery.  Listen to your body.

If you have questions, you may direct them to me through either this blog or through my websitehttp://www.eastwesthealingarts.org.  If you live in the Portland, Maine area, you’re invited to join in for not only Qigong classes, but also Taiji at the Maine Center for Taijiquan & Qigong.  The link is added here http://www.mainetaiji.com/, so you may visit the website for the class schedule and details on our studio.

cropped-taiji-logo1

Lets begin with the knees.  Before the actual movement, keep in mind the importance of maintaining healthy knees.  The knees and shoulders are the two most common areas for injury and strain because they have more range of motion than other joints in the human body.  We should do all we can to care for these areas.  Let’s begin!

Therapeutic Qigong – Part Three

Position 13 – Knee Rotation

Begin with Feet together.

Place both hands slightly on your hands.

  1. Slowly circle knees clockwise, 4 times
  2. Repeat the knee circles, counter clockwise, 4 times

Important – As you circle your knees, you are also exercising your hips, knees, and ankles.  Don’t forget to breathe evenly.

Position 14 – Side Lunge Turn

Body Opposite 45

Take a big step to the left and place both hands on your waist.

  1. Exhale as you slowly bend left leg and turn your body to the right at a 45 degree angle.
  2. Inhale as you slowly turn your body back to the center position, straightening both legs and shifting your weight to your center.
  3. Exhale as you slowly bend right leg and turn your body to the left at a 45 degree angle.
  4. Inhale as you slowly turn your body back to the center position, straightening both legs and shifting your weight to your center.

Repeat steps 1-4

Important – Bend legs as low as you can.  Keep you back straight

Position 15 – Cover Knee and Stretch Leg

Begin with feet together

  1. Place both hands on knees
  2. Slowly bend both knees with good support from feet
  3. Place hands on the tops of the feet, raise hips as you straighten legs
  4. Slowly roll upper body up and let hands relax at your side.
  5. Repeat above one time

Important Note: Normal breath.  Try to keep hands on feet as you raise hips and straighten legs.  This will aid lower back and associated leg muscle tissues.

Position 16 – Cover Opposite Knee,

Alternately Raise Arm

Take a big step to the left

  1. Cover left knee with the right hand, inhale
  2. Raise left arm forward and up over your head, palms up, simultaneously bending both knees, horse riding stance, exhale.
  3. Straighten legs and cover right knee with left hand, hands now on opposite knees, inhale.
  4. Raise right arm forward and up over your head, palms up, simultaneously bending both knees, horse riding stance, exhale.
  5. Straighten legs and cover left knee with right hand, hands now on opposite knees, inhale.
  6. Raise left arm forward and up over your head, palms up, simultaneously bending both knees, horse riding stance, exhale.
  7. Straighten legs and cover right knee with left hand, hands now on opposite knees, inhale.
  8. Raise right arm forward and up over your head, palms up, simultaneously bending both knees, horse riding stance, exhale.

Important – Breathe evenly.  When in horse stance, keep your back straight.

Position 17 – Arm Raise and Knee Hug

Begin with feet together.

  1. Slowly step forward with left foot, putting weight on left foot.  Raise arms above head with arms straight, palms inward, inhale.
  2. Separate arms to side, lift up right knee with both hands as high as you can, exhale.
  3. Step back with right foot and raise arms up again with palms inward, arms straight, weight on left foot.
  4. Circle arms down to your side and step back with left foot.
  5. Slowly step forward with right foot, putting weight on right foot.  Raise arms above head with arms straight, palms inward, inhale.
  6. Separate arms to side, lift up left knee with both hands as high as you can, exhale.
  7. Step back with left foot and raise arms up again with palms inward, arms straight, weight on right foot.
  8. Circle arms down to your side and step back with right foot.

Important Note: Stretch Arms as high as you can.  Breathe deeply, hug your knees as close to your chest as you can.

Position 18 – Slow Walking Forward / Backward

Begin with feet together, place hands on waist and relax shoulders.

  1. Step forward with left foot, lift right heel, weight on left foot.
  2. Shift weight back to right foot (sit back, bend right knee), lift toe up, heel down.
  3.   Step forward with right foot and put weight on right, left heel up
  4. Shift weight to left foot (sit back, bending left knee), right toe up and heel down.
  5. Shift weight to right foot with both legs straight, left heel up.
  6. Again shift weight to left (sit back) and right toe up.
  7. Step back with right foot.
  8. Step back with left foot, bringing feet together.  Repeat above with opposite foot movement.

Important Note: Walk slowly.  When shifting weight, put full weight on one side then the other, keeping back straight.  When stepping back, step with toes first, and the rest of the foot follows (toe, ball of the foot, heel)         

Advertisements

Qigong For The Upper Body

This will begin a series of blogs dedicated to Therapeutic Qigong and its practice to promote balance and wellness in the daily life.  Each blog in the series will address a specific region of the body.  There are 36 movements in the form I’ll be sharing.

4331281288_f8405600cdThrough the centuries Qigong has been taught in many various forms.  Some say there are hundreds if not thousands of different movements and styles, but their common thread holds to the Nurturing of Qi, the energy that flows and embraces the life force of every living creature and substance.  The disruption of that Qi through stagnation or excess results in imbalance and ultimately ill-health.  Qigong helps to restore balance through moving Qi throughout the body by a series of movements that specifically target various parts of the body.  Learning basic movements associated with each region of the body will help address either those specific regions or the whole body to maintain wellness and balance.

As with any physical activity, work within your own abilities and limitations. If you cannot get the full range of motion at first, make it a goal and go as far as you can. If you have any health issues, concerns, or limited mobility consult with your doctor first before exerting yourself more than you should.  The practice of Qigong has been known to improve overall health for those with High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Parkinson’s Disease, Muscular Dystrophy, Multiple Sclerosis, and Arthritis, among many other ailments.  It’s also effective for all ages and can compliment other sports activities such as Martial Arts, Weight Training, Running, and Aerobic Exercises to name a few. QiGong 2

The first six detailed in this blog address the upper body including the neck, arms, chest, upper back, and shoulders. They support these regions to relieve various concerns like neck and shoulder stiffness and pain – ligament and other soft tissue degeneration – bursitis – tendonitis – rotator cuff discomfort – headache relief – stiff or painful upper back – frozen shoulder – pre and post surgical therapy for these zones – limited range of motion for any of these areas.

If you have questions, you may direct them to me through either this blog or through my website http://www.eastwesthealingarts.org.  If you live in the Portland, Maine area, you’re invited to join in for not only Qigong classes, but also Taiji at the Maine Center for Taijiquan & Qigong.  The link is added here, so you may visit the website for the class schedule and details on our studio.

cropped-taiji-logo1

Therapeutic Qi Gong

Position 1 – Slow Neck Motion

Begin with feet together.  Breathe evenly through the body.  Step slowly to the left equal weight on both legs.  The distance between the feet should be shoulder width.  Place both hands on waist, shoulders relaxed.  Unlock all joints.  Knees and shoulders relaxed.

  1. Slowly turn head to left and inhale slowly while turning head.
  2. Exhale while turning head back to center
  3. Slowly turn head to right and inhale slowly while turning head.
  4. Exhale while turning head back to center
  5. Tilt head backward and inhale slowly while tilting head
  6. Exhale while moving head back to center
  7. Tilt head downward toward chest and inhale slowly while tilting head
  8. Exhale while moving head back to center

Important – If you have neck problems, you should repeat every day for eight cycles.  Stretch as far as you can, but do not over extend.  Work within your limits.  Keep your head straight while performing this movement.

Position 2 – Horizontal Arm Stretch

Begin with feet together.  Breathe evenly through the body.  Step slowly to the left equal weight on both legs.  The distance between the feet should be shoulder width.  Unlock all joints.  Knees and shoulders relaxed.  Lift arms up in front of you in a slightly elbow bent position at chest level.  Bring index finger and thumb of each hand close enough together to form almost a circle.  Hands should be placed in front as though you are pushing something away from you.

  1. Stretch arms to the side as far as you can, elbows pointing 45 degrees downward (hands moving into a relaxed fist as you stretch), eyes and head turn and follow to left when moving arms.  Inhale as you stretch
  2. Slowly open hands as you bring hands back to front while exhaling, eyes following back to center. 
  3. Repeat above except with eyes following to the right when stretching arms to the side.

Perform this movement four (4) times for one (1) set. 

Important – Remember to stretch arms as wide as possible, and breathe deeply.  Inhale as you stretch, exhale as you move hands back.

Position 3 – Vertical Arm Stretch

Begin with feet shoulder width apart.  Breathe evenly through the body.  Unlock all joints.  Knees and shoulders relaxed.  Bend both arms with fists up, elbows pointed down, and shoulders relaxed.

  1. Take a deep breath and slowly raise hands up, palms facing forward, eyes following the left hand up.
  2. Breathe out and slowly move hands down with fists up, and facing forward.  Eyes follow the right hand down.
  3. Take a deep breath and slowly raise hands again, palms facing forward, eyes following the right hand up.
  4. Breathe out and slowly move hands down with fists up, and facing forward.  Eyes follow the left hand down.
  5. Repeat above movements two more times. 

Important – Raise hands up as high as you can, with arms straight, breathing deeply and slowly, breathe in as you raise your hands, breathe out as you lower your hands.

Position 4 – Rotational Arm Stretching

Begin with feet shoulder width apart.  Breathe evenly through the body.  Unlock all joints.  Knees and shoulders relaxed.  Overlap hands in front of you.   

  1. With arms straight, slowly raise hands until overhead.  As you raise your hands, deep breath inhale and eyes follow hands upward.
  2. Separate your hands.  Slowly move hands down along the side of your body with straight arms, eyes following left hand as arms go down.
  3. Again, overlap hands in front of you and slowly raise hands until overhead.  As you raise your hands, deep breath inhale and eyes follow hands upward.
  4. Separate your hands.  Slowly move hands down along the side of your body with straight arms, eyes following right hand as arms go down.
  5. Repeat items 1-5. 

Important – Straighten and stretch arms as far as you can and breathe deeply

Position 5 – Angel Wings Shoulder Rotation

Begin with feet together.  Breathe evenly through the body.  Step slowly to the left equal weight on both legs.  The distance between the feet should be shoulder width.   Unlock all joints.  Knees and shoulders relaxed. Place both hands behind buttock area, with palms facing inward, but not touching the body.

  1. Inhale while slowly raising shoulders and hands along the spine, lifting shoulders as high as you can, eyes following left side.
  2. Exhale and slowly move hands to front of the body, relax shoulders and press palms downward.
  3. Inhale while slowly raising shoulders and hands along the spine, lifting shoulders as high as you can, eyes following right side.
  4. Exhale and slowly move hands to front of the body, relax shoulders and press palms downward.
  5. Repeat above steps twice for a total of four (4) rotations

Important – Maximum breath in and out, maximum shoulder movement.

Position 6 – Arm Back Stretch

Begin with feet shoulder width apart.  Breathe evenly through the body.  Unlock all joints.  Put right hand on lower back with palm facing out.

  1. Inhale.  Slowly raise left hand up from left side until above the head with arm straight and palm facing up.  Follow the left hand with your eyes.
  2. Exhale.  Slowly move left arm down behind lower back placing left hand above the right hand, palm side out.
  3. Inhale.  Slowly raise right hand up from right side until above the head with arm straight and palm facing up.  Follow the right hand with your eyes.
  4. Exhale.  Slowly move right arm down behind lower back placing right hand above the left hand, palm side out.
  5. Repeat above movements 1-4

Important – Breathe deeply and keep your back straight

Photo Credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/16230215@N08/4331281288″>Garden of Peace</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/”>(license)</a&gt;

This Spring – Take a Natural Break

8954971567_d821b8a113

Natural Path

We who live in the North Country can honestly say we “survived” the last winter.  Records for snow accumulation and low temperatures were broken.  Now that spring is finally beginning to reveal itself, many of us find ourselves going outside to dig into and work with dirt in various ways while taking a natural break.  There are so many benefits from connecting with the outside natural world.

Have you ever noticed how refreshed you feel after being outside and working with the earth?  How about walking around in a nearby preserve to witness new growth in the surrounding flora?  It’s so refreshing.  There’s actually evidence that identifies positive results from connecting with nature.

In an article published by the American Society of Landscape Architects written by Jared Green, Green identified research that shows taking a stroll through a natural setting can boost performance on “tasks calling for sustained focus.” “Taking in the sights and sounds of nature appears to be especially beneficial for our minds.” The same article goes on pointing out a fact, Dr. Marc Berman and fellow researchers at the University of Michigan found that “performance on memory and attention tests improved by 20 percent after study subjects paused for a walk through an arboretum. When these people were sent on a break to stroll down a busy street in town, no cognitive boost was detected.”

As a massage therapist, I see many cases of injuries caused from repetitive motion, no matter how insignificant the action may be, including moving a computer mouse or texting on a smart phone, not to mention repetitive heavy labor or work outs.  What’s fascinating is repetitive activities in the office place can also create other forms of stress.  Jared Green cited Michael Posner, professor emeritus at University of Oregon who studies attention, saying that our brains get fatigued after working for long periods of time, “particularly if we have to concentrate intensely or deal with a repetitive task.” Taking a break may or may not help deal with stress during high-pressure times. What’s crucial is the type of break taken: According to The Wall Street Journal, taking a stroll in the park “could do wonders” while drinking lots of coffee will just be further depleting.

3935703108_3a8c9e9382

Community Vegetable Garden

A 2008 article on “Gardening as a therapeutic intervention in mental health” in Nursing Times, originally written as a study by Matthew Page, MSc, unveiled the positive results found from gardening.  For example, “quantitative studies have found a significant reduction in symptoms of depression and anxiety following gardening-based interventions. Qualitative studies have provided insight into service users’ experiences of gardening-based interventions, with a range of potential benefits highlighted, including enhanced emotional wellbeing, improved social functioning, improved physical health and opportunities for vocational development.”

How can some of these examples be implemented into our lives?  The answers and solutions are quite simple when you think of them.

Have lunch in a natural setting.  Take your lunch in a natural setting wether brown bagged or purchased as a take out.  There are probably more “green areas” than you realize that are much closer to work than you think.

Create a raised bed garden.  Creating a raised bed garden accomplishes so much.  You get to connect with the earth!  You can raise your own veggies.  There’s nothing quite like the faste of food from your own garden.  Connect with family members too by making it a family project.

4095380295_ebe19b633f

Enjoy Nature!

Take the dog for a walk in a park or preserve.  Preserves are popping up nearly everywhere these days, so find one nearby and walk Fido there.  Make sure to take a small plastic bag with you too by the way.  You get exercise outside along with your K-9 companion.  You may even find some new places for the future to relax on your own.

Spend time with your yard, roof top garden, or community garden.  Opportunities to get outside are limitless when you explore the possibilities.  Have you noticed?  Gardens are cropping up everywhere – from prison yards to retirement and veteran homes.  Even apartment dwellers now have alternatives for getting their hands in the dirt through indoor gardening with decorative plants and even growing vegetables.  Raking leaves in your yard takes on a different meaning when it’s viewed as personal time and a way to reduce stress.  Regardless of your own circumstances, get outside!

Taking a walk in a natural setting or gardening as examples of connecting with nature can really  enhance our lives.  It reduces stress, provides exercise, reduces symptoms of depression and anxiety, and enhances our over all well-being.  So, take a natural break whenever you can for yourself.  Consider it a spring time gift to you!

Natural Path – photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/51866462@N07/8954971567″></a&gt; via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/”>(license)</a&gt;

Community Vegetable Garden – photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/42647587@N06/3935703108″>Stars Complex Urban Garden</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/”>(license)</a&gt;

Enjoy Nature – photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/32008328@N08/4095380295″>HAWAII NOV-09129</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/”>(license)</a&gt;